The Freedom to be free

This user did a blog post on freedom and spoke about how you should simply be who you are and enjoy life. Freedom is something we underappreciate. Right now, I’m listening to some strange Christmas opera and just enjoying the beginning of break from school (although the opera is horrible). I feel completely free because I don’t have any expected homework due or a lovely surprise in the form of a pop quiz. Besides physical freedom, I’m also kind of emotionally free as well. I guess you can say I am somewhat of an introvert at times because I feel as though no one is expecting much of me when I’m alone. It feels like I can breathe for myself instead of for everybody else. A lot of my friends are able confidently be who they are without doubting themselves. I am the total opposite most of the time. To be honest, I admit I am a weird one and I’ve only opened up this side of me to only a few people. Overtime, I have kind of learned to get out of the prison that I’ve built for myself by using the key of opening up to friends, family, or even strangers that I meet. Forgive yourself and open up. The thing that changes the outcome of the situation is if you choose to turn that key.

To forgive is to set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner was you. -Lewis B. Smedes
Everyone should have the freedom to be free. To be free, it is essential to know that there is no destination, just the journey. 
You could say the goal is to go on your journey. The goal is to journey, experience, feel, listen, learn, and take in everything.
Think of it like a car ride. You have a destination. There’s also beautiful scenery along the way. If you were so immersed on reaching the destination, you would have missed out on the journey. Of course, I’m not telling you that a goal is not essential either. If you never had a destination, there would be no journey. If there was no journey, what’s the point of having a destination?
To sum it all up, you don’t need to direct your entire being into accomplishing the goal of belonging and being happy. There is a journey set out for you. You’ll make mistakes. You will get hurt. Repeatedly. But, you’ll also experience, feel , and be free to be who you are.
I got my inspiration from this fantastic user!: http://typicalbl0gger.wordpress.com/
This is the specific post that I was inspired by for this post: http://typicalbl0gger.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/sweet-freedom-and-change/
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The One Who Could Have Been Something

On December 9th, 1918, Hank Gathers stepped up to the free throw line. Ready for the free throw, he collapsed suddenly. Although he got up and continued the game he was later diagnosed with an abnormal heartbeat. He was prescribed inderal to help his heart but it trapped his full potential, affecting his play drastically. He mad a decision to miss his appointments and cut down on the medications. Four months later, on March 4th, 1990,  in a tournament game against Portland, Hank ran up the court on a fastbreak received an alley oop pass, made an spectacular play, slamming the ball home. After he landed he took a couple steps up the court, collapsing, only this time, he didn’t get up. As he was on the ground the team doctors and trainers told him to stay on the ground. He put his head up using his last words to say, “I don’t want to lay down,” confidently, before dropping back onto the floor unconscious. He was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital.

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He was the face of college basketball in the 80s, he was the face of the WCC Tournament, and most of all he was the face of Loyola Marymount, their players, coaches, and staff. He and his Loyola team led the NCAA in scoring as a team, breaking scoring record after scoring record. This team was something special and Hank Gathers was the center of it. His death was a huge tragedy and a heartbreaking loss for not only Loyola Marymount, Hank’s family, and college basketball, but a huge loss for all sports overall as news of his death traveled across the nation.

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After his death many things were done to honor this great being. His teammate Bo Kimble shot the first  free throws in the rest of the NCAA tournament with his left hand sinking each of the three lefties he attempted. In addition, he was named the Player of the Decade, by WCC not only for his death, but his greatness and the legacy he would be leaving behind. One of the biggest ways he was honored in my opinion was by his team as they entered the NCAA tournament ready to demolish everyone in their path, not for themselves though.. but for Hank, their teammate, their brother, the family member who they all loved so much.

Hank Gathers left a mark on all the people and places he had been during his lifetime.He died so young and had the greatest potential. It was a truly heartbreaking loss. Hank could have been something. He would have been something. He led the nation in rebounding and scoring in college and gave it his all no matter what. He was the recipient of multiple All Player Awards, MVP Awards, and was even named Player of the Decade of the 1980s.In addition, Hank, knowing that he was undersized, knowing he was projected to struggle with the pros, did not care. He was prepared and didn’t have the thought of failing anywhere in his head. Hank Gathers would have been something. Hank Gathers would have been a great something. What a heartbreaking loss it was..

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P.S. I would like to shout out my friend, Ronak. His work inspired me to write this blog. Check out his similar post here.

http://thespidermancyclist.wordpress.com/2014/10/29/the-lost-of-a-fallen-potential-oscar-taveras/

Performance Enhancing Drug Tests

Many professional athletes in the past have either cheated or ruined their careers using steroids or performance enhancing drugs to get their way. Some examples include the famous case of cyclist Lance Armstrong, NBA player Hedo Turkoglu, and MLB all star Ryan Braun. Lance was revoked of every award he “earned” while the other two players were suspended from playing their respective sports. These players would have easily prevented disasters in their careers had drug tests been a necessity, except for Hedo Turkoglu, who had only used the steroids to help heal his nagging knee injury more effectively. Overall performance enhancing drug tests should not only be required but necessary for all sports in all levels including the collegiate and high school levels.

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The main reason for not allowing performance enhancing drugs is so that athletes cannot poison their body and receive unfair advantages over fellow competitors. Performance enhancing drugs have caused many problems for users in the past and definitely should not be something allowed in any level or competition, but for this to happen, the action starts in high school. Every year during four year high school plan each athlete should be tested for the use of steroids before they are allowed to play so that they will get in the habit of working hard to earn scholarships and success and to get in the habit would lead to athletes caring fro their bodies and reducing use of steroids/ performance enhancing drugs. In addition, with the use of performance enhancing drugs, as soon as one person on a team uses it, it is almost certain that others on the team will begin to use it as well. This results in even more unhealthy bodies in the long run and puts these new users at risk of new dangers that will come with using the drug. With all this evidence it is extremely obvious that performance enhancing drugs/steroids have absolutely no good for a high school student which is why performance drug tests should be a necessity for all athletes in high school. Not only will the competitions be more fair but all athletes will now be kept from the dangers and risks of using these drugs.

In conclusion, I believe that although steroids can be a great thing for older people with disabilities such as major back or knee problems, I do not believe they should be something that a teenager in high school or college should have access to. Although I do not think those two levels of sports should be allowed to use these drugs, I believe under special circumstances with a doctor’s consent, professional athletes should have the right to use them to speed up recovery or reduce pain in body problems. But other than for the use of medication, I do not believe any levels of sports should be allowed to use performance enhancing drugs and that each level should have at least two tests a year to search for these drugs and eliminate them in all athletes of all levels in all sports forever.

I hate writer’s block.

I am currently having a “writer’s block” which is when one can not think of anything to write even though I’ve been productively staring at my screen hoping to come up with the slightest feel of creativity about to strike me. Writer’s block is absolutely the most irritating thing. It’s like when you’re trying to have a conversation with someone and it just becomes and awkward silence. It’s really frustrating. The words don’t come to your mind and you find yourself awkwardly staring at the blank page. I think it comes from just not getting inspiration from anything or being afraid that your writing will suck. In this case, I apply to both of those reasons. So for this blog post, I decided to list out some ways to potentially cure writer’s block. I know, ironic right?

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There’s No Place Like Home

What is home to you? For me home isn’t where I live, it’s where I’m most at peace. Home is the place where you’re most comfortable but it is also the place where you’re born. For a lot of people home, the place where they’re happiest and most comfortable is where they are born. I sadly, am not one of those people. My home, is Utah. I was born in Fountain Valley in 1999 but moved to Utah when I was 4. There I only spent a year and a half living there before coming back to California. It wasn’t until 7 years later that I finally came back to Utah but even through my 7 year absence from Utah, it still felt like that was where I belonged.

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